Banksia Medical Centre

Banksia Medical Centre was established in 1979 by Dr Graham G. Jacobs, in a little house on 47 Dempster St. Esperance.

Dr Jacobs has always encouraged the growth of health professionals in the community and has been involved with training of medical students and nursing students, to ensure that our region might have sufficient quality health services.

The team at BMC feels strongly about providing quality health care, and encouraging safety and preventative health in the community and in local business.

Our Clinical Team

Owner & Principal Dr Graham Jacobs (Full-time)

Dr Genevieve McPherson (Part-time)

Dr Hermanus Lochner (Full-time)

Dr Patrick Glackin (Part-time) Wongutha CAPS Students and Chronic Hep B Clinics only

RN Kathryn Harvey (Full-time)

RN Clare Rigney (Part-time)

RN Alison Bell (Part-time)

EN Kali Morrison (Part-time)

RN Raelene Craft (Casual)

Our Administration Team

Deborah McLernon (Practice Manager)

Rhiannon Tracey (Medical Receptionist)

Emmeshe Bracken (Medical Receptionist)

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I have to make an appointment or can I just walk in?

Banksia Medical Centre accepts both walk-in patients and pre-booked appointments. Please be aware that there may be a wait for walk-in patients, as patients with appointments and urgent cases will be treated with priority.

Do I need a standard or a long consult?

Our standard appointments are between 10-20mins depending on which Doctor you are seeing. Some services like care plans, health assessments, skin checks or when there are multiple or complex issues to discuss, will require a long appointment.

Do I have a choice in which Doctor I see?

Each patient is free to choose which Doctor they would like to see for their health care. Please let us know which doctor you would prefer to see and we will make every effort to accommodate your wishes.

Sometimes a Doctor may choose to close their books, if they feel their list of patients has reached its capacity.

What happens if my doctor is absent?

We will always endeavour to make sure there is a doctor available to look after your needs. Should you be unable to see your regular GP, please note that all of our Doctors have equal access to your medical records and notes.

Can I speak to my Doctor over the phone?

Our Doctors do not take phone calls during consultations unless the situation is deemed urgent. All messages will be directed via Reception who will pass them on to your doctor.

It is unsafe for a Doctor to consult on an illness over the phone, but they may be happy to return your call to discuss certain results or provide important information.

Can I get my results over the phone?

Our staff are able to give most results over the phone, with the Doctor’s permission, however your Doctor may ask you to come in for a consult to discuss certain results; especially if there are follow-up actions needed.

Results that have not first been checked by a Doctor cannot be given.

How do I get a medical (sick) certificate?

Medical certificates can be provided by your GP during or following a consultation.

It is illegal for a Doctor to backdate a medical certificate, however they may be able to support your reason for previous time off work/study if the nature of your injury/illness suggests so. Please try to present early in your illness should you require a certificate.

How do I request a new referral?

Referrals generally last for 1 year, and our Doctors will require a consult with you should a new referral be needed. A lot can happen in 1 year, so it is extremely important that the information on your referral is up-to-date.

I had an injury whilst working, what should I do?

Any injury sustained during work should be treated as a Worker’s Compensation Claim. An initial visit should be booked as a long consult, as there is a bit of paperwork your Doctor will need to organise with you.

You will be asked to sign a Worker’s Comp agreement form at reception, and will be offered a free “Guide for Employees” handbook. This guide has important information about your rights and how the Worker’s Compensation process works.

What happens if I have to be admitted to the Esperance Hospital?

Banksia Medical Centre looks after Banksia patients as much as possible, however there may be the odd occasion where our Doctors are unable to treat you personally. In these uncommon circumstances you will be looked after by the Doctor on call at the Hospital.

Who owns my medical records?

The records are the notes the doctor makes to assist themselves or other doctors at the surgery.

Medical records are the property of the doctor or practice attended, but you have a right to the information contained in the records. Therefore although they do not belong to the patient, you are entitled to access the contents. This is backed by Commonwealth Privacy Legislation.

By your attendance to see the doctor, you have implicitly given him or her permission to take notes about the consultation.

How do I get my previous medical records to Banksia Medical Centre?

Our friendly reception team will help you fill out a Request form, which will be sent to your previous GP.

Please note that all family members over 18yo will need to sign this form, and that your previous GP may charge a fee for sending copies of your medical records.

How do I transfer my Banksia records to a new surgery?

A Request form will need to be filled out and signed at your new surgery, which will then be sent to us for processing.

In accordance with our transfer procedure, a health summary will be sent free of charge, as soon as we receive your request. We will then attempt to reach you by post or by phone to inform you of the fees should you wish to transfer a copy of your complete medical records.

Is it normal to pay a fee for transferring Medical Records?

Some Medical Centres may charge a fee for handling and copying your records which is backed by MDA National, but should reflect only the administrative costs involved.

Banksia does charge a small fee for records.

Fees for transferring medical records have not been common in Esperance until more recently, as there had been little or no choice in who a patient was able to see.